Think of another city that you love or admire. In your mind’s eye, did you see its streets? Streets make the city. It is hard to imagine a great city without visualizing its streets — because a great city is made of great streets where people mingle.

27 responses

  1. @jamesshelley I found this worked well for Minneapolis, Seattle, Paris, & Moscow. San Diego suffers, mostly because of the ubiquity of SoCal’s dismal freeways. But specific neighborhoods (Pacific Beach, Point Loma, Gaslamp) faired well. Perhaps it’s near-great.

  2. @JohnPhilpin Sure, there are some pretty places to drive…. That little scrap of I-15 that cuts through Arizona, I-5 around Mt. Shasta, the northern reaches of I-89 and I-91, even our local I-84 through the Columbia River Gorge can be breathtaking… (But all would be better without so many cars.)

  3. @jamesshelley While I enjoy walking around the street of Princeton and Hopewell (New Jersey) I don’t admire them. Or NYC. Or Boston. Or any large city. I don’t like being among the throngs of humans. It’s stressful. I don’t like the cacophonoy of noisses and smells. I much prefer the streams, and woods an nature trails of my town and the surronding towns. Peaceful. My town has no downtown. But we have a LOT of parks where people mingle.

  4. @JohnPhilpin @ciaran @macgenie @schuth I think, for me, this is the whole point of backcountry camping: going to beautiful places that don’t have interstates or freeways built through them yet. It leads me to suspect that beautiful places with highways would surely be even more beautiful without them? Is there such a thing as an enviroment that has been enhanced by a freeway?

  5. @ciaran This conversation reminds me of the Cees Nooteboom book, In The Dutch Mountains. The narrator is a road inspector from Spain, who waxes lyrical about roads in general, and how stories and roads are so similar to one another :)

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