Are We Actually Moving the Needle on Poverty?

Abe Oudshoorn discusses poverty reduction efforts in London: As tax payers and charity givers, we spend millions of dollars to address poverty… But does it all really make any difference?


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Date/Time
Monday, March 27, 2017
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Location
Central Library
251 Dundas St

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Event Series
Curious Public at Central Library (in partnership with London Public Library)

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We have been talking about the issue of poverty for a long time.

By 2006 no resident of London will be homeless. (Community Plan on Homelessness in London, October 2001, pg. 40)

And we have been making similar recommendations for a long time, too.

…the general strategies for addressing poverty in a community are consistent: advocating for increased income through higher social assistance and minimum wage rates, taxation strategies, and child benefit levels; increasing access to community supports such as quality child care, adequate and safe housing, and transportation; increasing access to health supports; addressing issues that contribute to poor education outcomes and poor jobs… (Poverty Elimination in London: A Municipal Approach to Community Well-Being and Vitality, Social Research & Planning, April 17, 2008, pg. 47)

The question is: are we actually getting anywhere?

Abe Oudshoorn (@abeoudshoorn) is currently Assistant Professor and the Year 3 & 4 Lead at The Arthur Labatt Family School of Nursing, Western University.  He is cross appointmented with Lawson Health Research Institute and the Department of Psychiatry, Western University. His teaching interests involve community health, mental health, global health, research methods/statistics, and advanced Nursing theory. And his research interests include women’s homelessness, program evaluation, health promotion, critical ethnography, qualitative methods, participatory action research, poverty and health, critical theory, mental health, and others.